1st Five Year Plan
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Chapter 26:
IRRIGATION AND POWER

Major And Minor Irrigation Projects

80. Questions are often raised about (i) the relative place assigned to major and minor irrigation schemes in the Plan, and (ii) the economics of such schemes. There can be no conflict between- major and minor schemes. There are parts of the country in which scope exists for large projects and there are others in which only smaller projects are possible.. Each area should be served by the kind of schemes for which it offers facilities. Large and small projects are thus complementary and not competitive. The Five Year Plan includes eight irrigation projects (including multi-purpose projects but excluding new major irrigation projects mentioned in para 45) costing above Rs. 5 crores each, sixteen costing between Rs. i crore and Rs. 5 crores ; twenty-one costing between Rs. i crore and Rs. 50 lakhs ; and twenty-seven schemes costing between Rs. 50 lakhs and Rs. 10 lakhs each. The area which will be irrigated in the five year period by these projects, is expected to be about eight million acres while about 7 million acres are expected to be irrigated by minor irrigation projects and tube-well schemes included ..in the Plan.

81. The relative advantages and disadvantages of minor and major schemes may be briefly summarised as follows :

Minor schemes are advantageous in that

  1. the initial outlay involved is small ;
  2. they can be executed quickly and yield quick results ;
  3. they generally require no special assistance by way of foreign personnel or equipment ; and
  4. local resources can be easily mobilised for their execution.

The disadvantages, on the other hand, are :

  1. their high cost of maintenance ;
  2. their relatively short life ; and
  3. the limited ' protection ' they give.

Owing to the operation of these causes, a fair proportion of such works are now in various stages of disrepair all over the country. Experience in India is that minor irrigation works can be maintained only if the beneficiaries undertake the obligation for this. At the same time where there are laws imposing such obligations it has not been found possible to enforce them strictly.

82. The advantages of major schemes are :

  1. they are generally multi-purpose in nature, i.e., apart from irrigation they confer other benefits such as hydro-electric power, flood control, navigation, etc.
  2. they utilise surplus waters of the river system which are flowing waste at present and in fact they constitute the only way in which such surplus waters can be utilised ;
  3. they give better protection in years of scarcity as there are large catchment areas.

The disadvantages are the initial high cost and the time they take for execution. The financial aspects vary from region to region.

In so far as the large multi-purpose projects in progress are concerned, their construction has not reached a stage at which final forecasts of financial yields can be made. It can however be stated that these projects can be financially justified only if the following conditions are strictly enforced : (i) There should be strict financial control and costs kept down as low as possible; (u) Betterment contributions should be levied on the areas that will be irrigated , (lii) Water rates should be levied which would be appreciably higher than the rates in the older projects, and more in accordance with present price levels ; (zo) Power generation should be regulated carefully and capital should not be sunk on electric plant much in advance of ascertained needs , and (o) Power should also be sold at economic rates.

Conditions For Inclusion Of New Projects In Future Plans

83. We consider it necessary to prescribe a procedure for determining what new projects should be taken up hereafter and in general for fixing the order of priority of various projects under consideration in different parts of the country. As has been stated earlier, the construction of new irrigation and power project is a matter of national interest and it is necessary to ensure that no large project is undertaken without the State Government concerned satisfying itself that investigations on the project are sufficiently detailed, that the financial forecast is accurate and that funds are available for the execution of the project according to the most economical programme. Only in this manner can we avoid the situation that has arisen in the last few years, under which a number of projects have been simultaneously taken up in different states without careful project reports and financial and other estimates, or an assessment of their aggregate effects on the overall economy of the country.

84. There is no doubt that irrigation and electricity are subjects in the State field of activity and that the State Governments must continue to exercise full initiative in regard to schemes of development. In view, however, of the existing financial position, and other limitationy, it is necessary that the Central Government and State Governments should act together in the implementation of such programmes. The first step in this direction was taken some time ago when the Government of India suggested to the State Governments not to undertake any new commitment for capital expenditure and requested them to obtain the prior concurrence of the Central Government before taking up new projects costing over rupees one crore.

85. For determining the priority of irrigation and power projects inter se, the following broad principles must be observed—

(l) A project for inclusion in a plan must have been investigated in_sufficient_detail as provided in the rules issued by the Government of India in 1929, in connection with the preparation of projects the cost of which exceeded the then powers of sanction of provincial Governments (Rs. 50 lakhs). These rules are incorporated in the departmental codes of State Governments, some of whom have also issued additional detailed instructions. It k imperative that before a project is administratively approved by a State Government, all preliminary investigations relating to the availability of water, the broad features of the design, the approximate cost, the availability and suitability of land for irrigation, the ability of the land owners and cultivators to pay the proposed betterment contributions and water charges etc., in the case of irrigation projects, and the probability of finding load for the power to be developed and the necessary machinery etc., for its utilisation in case of power projects, have all been properly carried out and detailed financial statements worked out in accordance with the standard forms prescribed for the purpose. Before according administrative sanction to any project, its economics must be carefully studied and examined by the State Government.

(2) Projects which will add to the food production in the country must receive priority over projects relating to other uses of river waters.

(3) Projects which are more remunerative in direct financial returns, in terms of cost of irrigation per acre or per unit of power generated and in total benefit to the community, and those which would yield quick results should be given preference.

(4) In any power project based on the use of coal, the possibility of using low grade coals, if available in the neighbourhood, must invariably be examined. Similarly the use of middlings from coal washeries etc., should be encouraged for the development of power. I is possible now to design furnances to use such low grade high-ash-content coals. These remarks also apply to extension to or replacements of existing power plants.

(5) Region-wise requirements of food and power must receive due consideration, and also the need of backward areas.

86. Having laid down the broad principles which should determine the priority of a project for inclusion in the Plan, we think that an appropriate body should be set up to advise on the relative priority of different projects on an all-India basis after examining the projects and satisfying itself that the schemes have been prepared after detailed investigation, that the estimates are reasonably correct and that the financial forecasts are reliable. Only those schemes would be eligible for consideration which have been fully investigated and are ready for execution. This body should consist of :

(i) A chairman to be appointed by the Government of India. (ii) Additional Secretary, Ministry of Irrigation and Power. (iii) A representative of the Ministry of Finance. (iv) President, Central Board of Irrigation and Power. (v) One engineer not in the service of any government in India.

The Chief Engineer of the State concerned will be co-opted as a member when a project prepared by him is being examined.

87. The procedure to be followed should be as follows :—

(i') As soon as a project has been fully investigated and project report prepared, the State Government concerned should send copies of the report and accompanying documents to the Committee.

(ii') The Committee will have the scheme technically examined by the Central Water ana Power Commission in the first instance to see whether :

  1. all necessary investigations have been carried out,
  2. the estimates of expenditure are reasonably correct, and
  3. the estimates of revenue are based on adequate data.

The Central Water and Power Commission will make its examination of each project in close consultation with the Chief Engineer in charge, and where necessary with officers of the Central Ministry concerned.

(i') A copy of the report of the Central Water and Power Commission should then be made available to the State Government concerned who, if they like, may send a further note to the Committee.

(ii) The Committee will then proceed to examine the scheme and will submit its report to the Government of India.

Hydrologic Investigations

88. During the next 15 to 20 years, a large number of irrigation and power projects have to be undertaken. Before work can be taken up on any such large project, it is necessary to collect detailed data about the availability of water and the manner in which available supplies vary from year to year and during different periods in the same year. This information, which for proper designs should be available for 30 to 50 years, has to be supplemented with rainfall data of the catchment area, the distribution of rainfall, its intensity, temperature, regeneration in the river etc. Unfortunately, there has been no systematic collection of basic hydrologic data for the rivers of India. State Governments during the last 20 to 30 years have undertaken collection and study of data with reference to individual projects under operation or under consideration but no overall study of a river system or its catchment has been attempted. Lack of hydrologic data can lead to defective designs.

We, therefore, recommend that all State Governments sho tid carry out detailed hydrologic investigations for important river systems. The expenditure on these investigations is small when compared with the benefits likely to be achieved when the river or any part of it is developed. The Central Water and Power Commission should prepare necessary technical instructions for the collection of basic hydrologic data in consultation with the States and the State Governments should set up arrangements for collecting such data.

Rural Electrification

89. It has been stated in paragraph 23 above that the development of electricity in India has so far been mainly urban, and hardly 10 per cent of the country's population enjoy the benefits of electricity. Under the Plan, large blocks of power will become available for rural areas and State Governments should take steps to see that villagers are enabled to utilize these to the best advantage.

Experience has shown that, given the necessary facilities, the use of electric power for agricultural operations would be popular. As electricity is extended to the villages, there is no doubt that farmers will use it more and more for agricultural operations other than pumping etc., and in the processing of agricultural produce. In this, they should receive assistance from government in the shape of loans to enable them to have their premises fitted with electricity and to buy electric appliances for work now done by animal or manual labour. A scheme similar to that introduced by the Rural Electric Administration of the U. S. A. will have to be introduced under which long term loans should be given to village co-operatives for rural electrification and development. Electricity will also assist cottage industries. It was estimated in 1942 that about 12,000 power looms were operating in the villages of undivided India of which more than half were in the then Bombay Presidency. The total number of handlooms in India in 1942 was estimated at 200 times the number of powerlooms. If power can be supplied over a small proportion of these their production would increase. Loans should be made available for such purposes as well.

90. There is a special advantage in the encouragement of agricultural load. It has been estimated that the utilisation of one kW of power in industry requires an investment of about Rs. 3,000 On the other hand, the utilisation ofi kW of electric power in agriculture, requires a much smaller capital investment of about Rs. 1,200 per unit. Apart from this, most of the equipment required can be produced in the country and its operation does not require technical skill of a high order.

Public Co-Operation

91. We have elsewhere dwelt in detail on the need for arousing public enthusiasm for and securing public co-operation in the implementation on the Plan. ' Here it is proposed to refer more specifically to the special aspects of public co-operation in connection with the development of major irrigation, and power projects. What is essential is that the people in every area should feel that the project included in the Plan is their own—intended for improvement of conditions in their area—and that they should make special sacrifices for getting it completed. The ways in which such public co-operation can be obtained vary from region to region and it should be the aim of State Governments to see that this is secured in the largest measure possible. We have already referred to the levy of betterment contribution. Large schemes cannot be financed unless this principle is accepted and adequate levies are made towards the capital cost. It is estimated that under a suitable system between one-third and one-fourth of the capital cost of a project can be recouped by betterment levies. The levy of betterment contribution in the form of land from the larger holdings will also be useful. By this means, it will be possible to obtain lands needed for community use, for village forests and grazing, markets, etc., to bring about consolidation of holdings ; to find lands for assignment to landless labourers and in other ways to effect improvement in the agricultural economy of the villages commanded by the project.

92. There is also another way in which the traditional methods of carrying out such projects can be improved. In framing estimates for works like a canal system, on which unskilled labour is employed, the rule should be to fix the rates on the basis that work is done by the villagers on the canals in their own villages, and not on the basis of work being let to contractors, large or small. Villagers should be organised in co-operatives for taking up such work. By tlus means there will be appreciable reduction in the cost and the labour force in the villages will benefit by the payments made. The State Government and local leaders should devote their best efforts to the task of obtaining local co-operation in as many forms as possible in the execution of large projects. The Planning Commission held discussions on this subject with officers of the Punjab Government connected with the Bhakra-Nangal Project and a beginning has been made with the introduction of this system for the excavation of Bhakra canals. The Bombay and the Madras Governments have this system in operation on some of their projects. The Rajasthan and the Madhya Bharat Governments have agreed that this system will be adopted throughout the canal system of the Chambal Valley Project. Other states have also accepted the principle and the Planning Commission hopes that this will become a normal feature in all large projects.

93. In paragraph 75 above, we have given some suggestions for making the most economic use of available irrigation supplies. Most of these suggestions can be adopted only with a large measure of public co-operation and all efforts must be made to arouse public enthusiasm to use the water provided by the State irrigation works to maximum advantage.

94. It is not fully appreciated that private irrigation works have in the past made a substantial contribution to the development of irrigation in India. There is no doubt that large irrigation projects should be executed by States but every effort should be made to encourage associations of landholders or village co-operatives to undertake small irrigation schemes, tanks, etc., for purposes of irrigation. Out of 50 million acres that are irrigated annually in India (see Table 2) about 13 million acres are irrigated by private wells and 2 million acres by private canals. In the chapters on Agricultural Development we have made our proposals for new developments in this field. There is, however, an important aspect which we would like to refer here. A fairly large proportion of these private irrigation works, which generally comprise village tanks and small canals are allowed to fall out of repair or disuse for a variety of reasons among which are disputes among owners, and village factions. In recent years large sums of public money have been spent in different parts of the country in resuscitating these old abandoned private irrigation works. The Plan also provides for substantial assistance in this direction. It is important in the national interest that all private irrigation works which are now being constructed or resuscitated should continue to be maintained with a reasonable standard of efficiency. The co-operation of the people must be sought in this endeavour. The methods to be adopted for securing the continued efficiency of these private irrigation works must vary from one part of the countryto another. We recommend that States should take effective steps in this matter, if need be by promoting legislation for this purpose in accordance with local conditions.

95. For the successful implementation of any power project, a large measure of public co-operation is in all cases necessary for building up the load for the utilisation of the power generated. Apart from this, in the case of some industries it is considered advisable and at times advantageous for the industry to have its own generating plant. It may be possible to integrate such power houses or in any case the surplus capacity of such power houses with the nearest public electric supply undertaking to the mutual advantage of both the industry and the electricity undertaking.

IRRIGATION AND POWER

table I List of Principal Irrigation Works of India (referred to in paragraph 13)

Name of State Name of Work Year of completion Total capital outlay (Rs.in lakhs) Area irrigated (thousand acres)

Percentage return on capital outlay

Bihar Son Canals 1875 2,68 655 7-3
  Tribeni Canal 1914 82 114 3-1
Bombay Nira left-bank Canal. 1906 1,48 90 4-7
  Godavari Canals 1916 1,07 63 4-2
  Pravara Canals 1926 l.51 90  
  Nira right-bank Canals 1938 4.12 89 8
Madhya Pradesh Tandula Canals 1925 1,20 158  
  Mahanadi Canals 1927 1.59 199  
Madras Cauvery delta system 1889 87 1,070 13-9
  Godavari delta system 1890 2,10 1,229 121
  Kurnool Cuddapah Canal .   2,34 88 0-8
  Pennar river canals . 1894 71 178 6-5
  Periyar system 1897 108 202 5-6
  Krishna delta system 1898 2,27 1,002 15-7
  Lower Coleroon anicut 1903 30 123 10-1
  Krishna east-bank Canal Extensions. 1913 59 100 7-8
  Cauvery-Mettur Project 1934 6,46 232 1-7
Orissa Orissa Canals . 1895 2,72 233  
Punjab (I) Western Jumna Canal 1820 2,04 1018 8-1
  Upper Bari Doab Canal 1879   783 20-9
  Sirhind Canal . 1884 2,67 2,312 14'6
  Eastern Canal 1928 1,14 190  
Uttar Pradesh Eastern Jumna Canal 1831 66 446 63-2
  Ganga Canal . 1856 4,66 1,620 25-2
  Agra Canal 1875 1,29 343 4-6
  Lower Ganga Canal 1880 4.67 1,251 8-6
  Betwa Canal . 1893 1,24 221 ro
  Ken Canal 1909 67 140 5-4
  Sarda Canal 1930 ".57 1,297 2-9
  Tube-wells   4.49 93^ 6
West Bengal Damodar Canals   1,28 184  
  Midnapore Canals   85 74  
Hyderabad Nizamsagar Canal 1940 4.72 275  
Mysore Krishnarajasagar Canals 1932 2,60 92  

Area Cultivated and Irrigated in (referred to in paragraphs)

Sl.No. Name of State Gross area Classified area Culturable area Sownarea
1. 2 3 4 5 6
Part 'A ' States
1. Assam 54,404 33,400 24,109 6,192
2, Bihar 45,on 44,330 31,338 22,607
3- Bombay 71,318 58,059 34,735 34,473
4. Madhya Pradesh 83.374 82,991 42,406 32,305
5. Madras 81,785 80,796 52,108 35,796
6. Orissa 38,487 18,053 10,980 7,451
7 Punjab (I) 23,922 23,236 16,117 13,337
8. Uttar Pradesh 72,581 71,428 52,605 39,780l,
9. West Benga 19,696 19,549 13,609 12,978
total 490,578 431,842 278,007 204,919
Part ' B ' States
10. Hyderabad 52,588 52,927 38,507 22,530
11. Jammu and Kashmir 59,379 3,360 3,443 1,301
12. Madhya Bharat 29,746 22,552 12,091 9,691
13- Mysore 18,873 17,385 10.286 6,596
14. Pepsu 6,450 6,491 5,772 4,844
15- Rajasthan 83,332 20,669 7,541 9,450
16. Saurashtra 13,729 1,397 7,200 1,013
17. Travancorc-Cochin 5,852 5,350 3,254 3,046
total 269,949 130,131 88,094 58,471
Part 'C' Statel
18. Ajmer 1,547 1,561 8.8 388
i9. Bhopal 4,402 4,432 2,522 1,062
20. Bilaspur 290 285 80 124
21. Coorg 1,015 1,012 321 166
22. Delhi 370 366 286 256
23. Himachal Pradesh 6,689 2,305 398
24. Kutch 10,703 4,974 245
25. Manipur 5,582
26. Tripura 2,580 2,634 351 472
27. Vindhya Pradesh 15,106 1610 520
28. Sikk'm 1,757
29. Andaman and Nicobar Islands 2,012
total 52,053 19,179 4,826 3,233
grand total 812,580 581,152 370,927 26.23

(Figures in Cols. 3 to 13 are in thousands of acres)

Area irrigated (1949-50)
Sl. No. Name of State

ByGovt. canals

By tanks By Govt. works 7+8 Byprivate canals Bywells
7 8 9 10 11
Pate ' A' States
1 Assam 2 22 24 655
l. Bihar . 821 1,136 1957 583
3. Bombay 378 4 532 64 1,035
4- Madhya Pradesh 269 1,140 1,409 206
5. Madras 4,410 3,226 7,636 156 1,959
6. Orissa 367 473 840 53 34
7. Punjab (I) . 3,636 7 3,643 337 1,845
8. Uttar Pradesh 4,571** 12** 4,583** 16** 4,323**
9. West Bengal 279 1,035 1,314 304 15
total 14,733 7,205 21,938 1,584 10,000
Part ' B' States
10. Hyderabad . 173 834 1,007 13 418
11 Jammu and Kashmir 97 5 102 516 8
12. Madhya Bharat 135 36 171 280
13. Mysore 262 611 873 3 85
14. Pepsu 1,297* 1,297 24* 618*
15. Rajasthan 631 70 701 11 672
16. Saurashtra 3 3 60
17. Travancore-Cochin 365 123 488 91 33
total 2,963 1,679 4,642 658 2,174
Part ' C ' States
18. Ajmer 16 16 99
19. Bhopal• 2 1 3 11
20. Bilaspur 5
21. Coorg 4 2 6
22. Delhi . 27 4 31 19
23. Himachal Pradesh•
24. Kutch . 9 9 60
25. Manipur
26. Tripura
27. Vindhya Pradesh . 37* 17* 54 * 164*
28. Sikkim
29. Andaman and Nicobal Islands
total 70 49 119 5 353
grand total 17,766 8,933 26,699 2,247 12,427

Area Cultivated and Irrigated in '(Referred to in paragraphs)

Sl. No. Name of State Area irrigated (1949-50) Percentage of area
By other sources 9 Grand Total+10+11I+ 12

Sown to culturable
Col. 6 Col. 5

Irrigated to sown Col. 13
Col. 6

Irrigated to culturable Col. 13Col. 5

12 13 14 15 16
Part ' A ' States
1. Assam 403 1,082 26 17 4
2. Bihar 1,740 4,280 72 19 14
3. Bombay 129 1,760 99 5 5
4 Madhya Pradesh 71 1,686 76 5 4
5- Madras 320 10,070 69 28 19
6. Orissa 678 1,605 68 22 15
7. Punjab (I) 21 5,846 83 44 3
8. Uttar Pradesh 1,882 10,803 76 27 21
9. West Bengal 680 2,313 95 16 15
total 5.924 39,446 78 19 14
Part ' B ' States
10. Hyderabad 50 1,488 58 7 4
l1. Jammu and Kashmir 75 701 38 54 20
12. Madhya Bharat 11 462 80 5 4
13- Mysore 198 1,159 64 18 11
14. Pepsu 20- 1,959 84 40 32
15. Rajasthan 89 1,473 125 16 20
16, Saurashtra 4 67 7 1
17 Travancore-Cochin 500 1,112 94 87 34
total 1- 947 8,421 66 15 10

Figures are for the-year 1948-49.

(Figures in Col. 15 are in thousands of acres)

Sl.No.Area irrigated (1949-50) Percentage of area Byother sources Grand Total 9+10+II+ 12 Sown to culturable Col. 6 Irrigated to sown Col. 13 Irrigated to culturable. Col. 13
Col. 5 Col. 6 Col. 5
12 13 14 15 16
Part 'C' States
18. Ajmer 1 116 42 30 13
19. Bhopal 3 17 42 2 1
20. Bilaspur 5 6
21. Coorg . 1 7 52 4 2
22. Delhi 50 90 19 17
23. Himachal Pradesh 135 135 38
24. Kutch 69 34
25. Manipur
26. Tripura
27. Vindhya Pradesh 219 42
28. Sikkim
29. Andaman and Nicobar Islands
total 141 618
grand total 7,012 48,486 75 18 13

"Figures are for the year 1950-51

Table 3 Major (Existing ) Power Stations in India (Public utilities only as on
31st December, 1951) (Referred to in paragraph 22 )
T - Thermal; H - Hydro

State/Name of power system and year of commencement of supply Installed capacity (thousand kWh)

Trans-nission lines 33 kV. and above ircuit miles) Operation Statistics
Units generated (million kWh) Maximum Demand (thousand kWh) Annual load factor in percent.
Bihar
Sijuah (Jherriah) Electric Supply Coy. Ltd. (1916) 18 (T) 80 15 61
Patna Electric Supply Coy. (1929) 13* (T) 29 7 49
Bombay
Ahmedabad Electricity Coy Ltd. (1915)- 97 (T) 292 64 52
Kalyan (Chola) Power Station 40 (T)
Tata Hydro-Electric Agencies (19.15). 244 (H) 502 1448 254 65
Madhya Pradesh
Jubbulpore Electric Coy. Ltd. (1927). 9 (T) 21 5 48
Madras
Madras City Electricity System (1909). 48 (T) 47 130 28 52
Pykara (1932) 39 (H)

1901

234 44 61
Mettur (1937) 40 (H) 221 46 55
Papanasam (1938) 23 (H) 135 32 55
4 (T)
Punjab
Jogindernagar (1933) 48 (H) 429 174 35 57

Contd....

State/Name of Power system and year of commencement of supply Installed capacity (thousand kWh) Transmission lines 33 kV. and above (circuit miles) Operation Statistics
Units generated (million kWh) Maximum Demand (thousand kWh) Annual load factor in percent.
Utiar Pradesh
Allahabad Power Station (1916) 12 (T) 28 6 54
Lucknow Power Station (1917) 14 (T) 39 8 55
Kanpur Electric Supply Administration (1921). 64 (T) 188 36 60
Ganga Canal Grid (1926) . 19 (H) 211 38 63
30 (T)
West Bengal
Calcutta Electric Supply (1899) . 467 (T) 165 1032 246 48
Gourepore Electric Supply Co. Ltd. (1921). 53 (T)

77 23 38
Dishergarh Power Supply Co. Ltd. (1922). 16 (T)

58 9 71
Hyderabad
Hussain Sagar Station (1910) 22 (T)

47* 53
Mysore
Shimshapura 17

(H) 1499

Sivasamudram (1902) 42 525 121 50
Jog (1948) 48
Travancore-Cochin
Pallivasal (1940) 28 (H) 152 28 61
Delhi
Delhi Power Station (1908) . 43 (T) 140* 28 57

*Estimated.

Table 4 Per capita Use of Electricity in the States of India (Referred to in paragraph 22)

Name of State Population (millions) (1941 Census) Total installed capacity (kW) Capacity installed per 1000 of population (kW) Units generated (million kW) kWH Generated per capita
1 2 3 4 5 6
Assam 9-689 3.362 0-247 5-777 0-633
Bihar 40-219 44978 n8 126-125 3-131
Bombay 35-944 416,185 "579 1612-378 44-858
Madhya Pradesh 21-328 27,844 1-306 64-273 3-014
Madras 56-952 168,025 2-950 643'708 11-303
Orissa 14-644 4,616 0-315 5-693 0-389
Punjab (I) 12-639 61,377 4-856 178-127 14-093
Uttar Pradesh 63-254 183,841 2-911 510-671 8-073
West Bengal 24-787 522,294 21-071 1046-758 42-230
Hyderabad 18-653 21,073 1-129 46-470 2-49
Mysore 9-072 107,200 1-87 443-522 48-889
Madhya Bharat 7-942 13,688 1-723 29-298 3-689
Rajasthan 15-298 24,120 1-576 44-810 2-929
Pepsu 3-469 6,740 1-943 5-679 1-637
Saurashtra 4-136 21,893 5-291 35-818 8*660
Travancore-Cochin 9-265 34.586 3-732 147-305 15-899
Delhi 1-744 37.536 21:523 122-302 70-127

Table 5 Irrigation and Power Projects in the Five Year Plan Abstract

Expenditure proposed during 1951-56 (Rs. lakhs) Irrigation ('ooo acres) Power (ooo kW)
Irrigation Power Total By 1955-56 On Completion By 1955-56 On Completion
Multi-purpose projects
Bhakra-NangaI 77,50 1,361 3,604 96 144
Harike 10,62

Damodar Valley . 41,70 595 1,141 194 274
Hirakud 44,00 26l 1,785 48 123
Additional funds for the above Projects. 50,00
New Schemes 40,00 (See paragraph 45)
total 263,82 2,217 6,530 338 541
Part 'A' States
Assam 2,00 83 2,83 218 218 5 7
Bihar .... 9.73 7.09 16,82 675 777 11 11
Bombay 22,69 10,43 33,12 474 893 83 84
Madhya Pradcsh 3,08 6,00 9,08 114 184 73 73
Madras .... 34,08 50,24 84,32 435 608 196 307
Orissa .... 3,00 3.91 6,91 480 480 8 8
Punjab .... 3,26 38 3,64 666 774
Uttar Pradesh 19,0 14,10 33,21 l,36l 3,181 169 124
West Bengal 15.37 76 16,13 917 917 4 4
total . 112,33 93,74 206,07 5,340 8,032 489 6l8
Part 'B' States
Hyderabad 24,79 3,21 28,00 306 731 53 53
Jammu and Kashmir 2,06 1.55 3,60 76 169 7 7
Madhya Bharat 3,28 2,28 5,56 83 152 15 18
Mysore 7,16 12,68 19,84 30 250 72 120
Pepsu 34 30 65 129
Rajasthan 5,04 41 5,45 243 523 11 11
Saurashtra 4.75 2,13 6,88 108 120 12 13-
Travancore-Cochin 4,78 10,35 15,13 17 168 81 81
total 52,20 32,91 85,10 863 2,242 251 302
Part 'C' States
Ajmer 11 11
Bhopal 28 28
Coorg . 25 25
Himachal Pradesh 13 93 75 100 1
Kutch 91 23 17 38 38 114
Tripura 7 7
Manipur 12 12
Vindhya Pradesh 51 51 3 3
total 1,82 1.59 3,41 113 138 4 4
grand total 558,41 8,533 16,942 1082 1465
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