2nd Five Year Plan
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Chapter 19:
PROGRAMME OF INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT

Asessment Of Industrial Progress In The Second Plan

60. Levels of development of capacity and production.— The statement below of some of the principal overall targets in both the.public and the private sectors shows that the second plan will be a period of intensive and many-sided industrial effort.

National targets for some major Industries

  Industry Unit 1955-56 1960-61 (target)
Capacity (estimated) Production (estimated) Capacity Production
1.Iron and steel—
  (a) Finished steel (main producers) 000 tons 1.300 1.300 4.680 4.300
  (b) Pig iron for foundries 000 tons 380 380 980 750
2. Structural fabrication . tons 2,26,000 1,80.000 5,00,000 5,00,000
3. Heavy Foundry-cuw-Forge shops— (a) Steel foundry tons     15.000 15,000
  (b) Forging shops tons     12.000 12,000
  (c) Cast Iron foundries tons     10.000 10.000

PROGRAMME OF INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT

Industry Unit 1955-56

1960-61(target)

Capacity (estimated) Production (estimated) Capacity Production
4. Ferro-Manganese tons 28,000 N.A- 1,71,800 1,60,000
5. Aluminium tons 7,500 7,500 30,000 25,000
6. Locomotives Nos. 170 175 400 400
7. Automobiles Nos. 38,000 25,000 38,000 57,000
8. Heavy Chemicals— (a) Sulphuric 000 tons 242 170 500 470
(b) Soda ash tons 90,000 80,000 2,53,000 2,30,000*
(c) Caustic soda tons 44,300 36,000 1,50,400 1,35,400*
9.Fertilizers—
(a) Nitrogenous (fixed nitrogen) tons 85,000 77,000 3,82,000 2,90,000
(b) Phosphatic as tons 35,000 20,000 1.20,000 1,20,000
10. ship-building GRT 50.000 90,000
(51-56) (56-61)
11. Cement 000 tons 4,930 4,280 16,000 13,000
12. Refractories tons 4,44,000 ' 2,80,000 10,00,000 8,00,000
13. Petroleum Refining (in terms of crude processed) mil. tons 3.625 3.6 4.31 4.3
14. Paper and paper board 000 tons 210 200 450 350
15. Newsprint tons 30,000 4,200 60,000 60,000
16. Rayon— (a) Rayon filament mill Ibs. 22.0 15.0 68.0 68.0
(b) Staple fibre 16.0 13.2 32.0 32.0
(c) Chemical pulp 000 tons 30.0 30.0
17. Diesel Engines (below 50 H.P.) H.P. 2,00,000 1,00,000 2.20,000 2,05,000
18. Bicycles 000 Nos. 760 550 895 1,000
19 Electric Motors (below 200 H.P.) H.P. 2,92,000 2,40,000 6,00,000 6,00,000
20 AC.S.R- conductors . tons 15,370 9,000 20,400 18,000

* Represents gross production. Since part of the output is proposed to be Utilised within the works for conversion to other products, quantities available for sale will be 185,000 tons of soda ash and 106,600 tons of caustic soda.
2,50,000 bicycles are expected to be produced in the decentralised sector so that the total production would be 12,50,000.

61. Plant capacities and production costs.—With the high prices for plant and machinery which have prevailed since 1950, it will only be possible to secure reasonably low cost of production in different industries by spreading overheads over a larger output. In other words, plant capacities have to be planned on a larger scale than hitherto. A detailed examination of proposals for different industries shows that the new units proposed to be established in many industries will be large enough to offset higher capitalization costs. The sizes of coke-ovens and blast furnaces in thfi stRfl n1ant< havp ilailv cflnnr.iti'p'i of 1 000 tnr\K andabove. The daily capacity of new sulphuric acid plants will be 25 tons and above—one of the new plants will in fact have a daily capacity of 150 tons—as against 10 ton plants which were common in the past and the maximum capacity of 75 tons per day installed so far. Similarly the Development Council for Heavy Chemicals (Alkalis) has recommended the minimum size of electrolytic caustic soda plants at 20 tons per day. In the case of paper mills a minimum capacity of 25 to 50 tons per day is expected to be the normal feature at the end of the second plan. Cement plants will have normally a minimum capacity of 200,000 tons per annum. In this industry economics in distribution costs are expected to be secured through widespread usage of bulk handling methods wherever possible. For facilitating bulk handling in a larger measure, the railway plan provides for increase in tank wagons and particularly those of special types such as are needed for the transport of chlorine and ammonia.

62. Technological Advances.— Considerable advance is visualised in the introduction of newer techniques in the plants proposed to be established. The new techniques and designs proposed under the steel expansion programmes have been mentioned earlier. The recovery of sulphur from coke-oven gases at the Durgapur Coke-oven plant and of ammonium sulphate and other by-products from coke-oven gas by utilising the waste pickling liquor in place of sulphuric acid at TISCO's works will mark the development of modem techniques in by-product recovery operations. Fermentation techniques will be more widely practised in the production of antibiotics at Pimpri.

63. Transition to Metric System arid Standardization of Processes and products.—Following the decision of the government to switch over to the metric system on the basis of a phased programme, action has been initiated through a Standing Committee under the Ministry of Commerce and Industry. It is expected that, wherever possible, the metric system will be adopted in the new plants to be set up.

In the field of standardization of processes and products, it is envisaged that the work on steel economy initiated in 1954 by the Indian Standards Institution, as part of its programme under the first plan, will be completed, resulting in a measure of rationalisation in the consumption of steel. With the large expansion of domestic production contemplated in the second plan, standardisation will promote greater understanding and confidence between buyers and suppliers of industrial products both within the country and in foreign markets. The second five year plan provides Rs. 60.6 lakhs for the Indian Standards Institution. Success in implementing standards will depend largely on the existence of adequate facilities for testing of products. In the case of capital goods and durable consumer goods, these facilities should provide for the evaluation of performance specifications also. With the expansion of the Government Test House during the second plan, additional facilities are expected to be brought into existence. A proposal to establish a research centre to meet the requirements for testing and development facilities for heavy electrical plant and equipment is also under consideration.

Development Of Raw Materials

64. The consumption of primary mineral and agricultural raw materials in organised industries will increase considerably during the second five year plan. The position as regards minerals which are found within the country is set out in the chapter on Development of Minerals.

As regards some of the imported minerals, like crude petroleum, sulphur and rock phosphate, consumption levels are expected to be as follows:

1955-56 1960-61
Rock phospate ('000 tons) 55 400
Sulphur COOO tons) 75 210
Crude petroleum (million tons) 3.23* 3.9

65. Industrial programmes will also draw substantially upon agricultural raw materials like raw jute, cotton, sugarcane, oil-seeds, timber, bamboos and sabai grass. Additional requirements of timber will arise largely from'production targets envisaged for chemical pulp and newsprint in comparison with which the demands arising from additional production of matches and plywood would be comparatively small. Targets for the production of oils include the utilization of about 300,000 tons of cotton seed and 800,000 tons of oilcakes as against current consumption levels estimated at 100,000 and 60,000 tons respectively. The requirements of bamboo as well as sabai grass arise from the programme for the development of the paper industry and newsprint production. It is difficult to assess the demand for bamboo with precision since there is scope for drawing upon other cellulosic materials like sabai grass, bagasse and certain semi-hard timbers. The extent to which different cellulosic raw materials will be available during the second plan is being examined by a Committee set up by the Ministry of Food and Agriculture. Requirements of raw cotton and sugarcane are estimated to be as follows:

1955-56 1960-61
Raw cotton (million bales) 5.0 5.9
Sugarcane (million tons) 16.7 22.5

66. Export Targets.—In certain fields production targets have been framed with special reference to the need for increasing foreign exchange earnings and stepping up exports. For the achievement of these targets, standardization of manufactured products, export promotion policies by way of rebate of import duties and establishment of Export Promotion Councils for major industries have already been taken in hand. In the nature of things it is difficult to lay down a rigid and long-term policy in regard to exports and, according to circumstances, appropriate policies and measures have to be devised. The following are the main export targets which have been formulated for achievement by 1960-61.

Cotton textiles: cloth 1,000 to 1,100 million yards.
lute Manufactures 900,000 tons.
Ail silk fabrics 10.0 million yards.
Saleable steel 200,000 to 300,000 tons,
Ferro-manganese 100,000 tons.
Bicycles (numbers) 150,000.
Engineering goods other than bicycles Value—Rs. 3 to 5.0 crores.
Titanium Dioxide 1,000 to 1^00 tons.
Coke 30,000 tons-
Salt 300,000 tons.
Vegetable oils 2,14,000 tons.
Starch 10,000 tons.
Vanaspati 20.000 to 25,000 tons.

67. Expansion in Different Sectors.—Progress in basic industries is one of the principal indicators of industrial development. During the first plan, some progress was made in this field through the establishment of the Sindri Fertilizer Factory, the Chittaranjan Locomotive Factory, the Tata Locomotive and Engineering Works, petroleum refineries and textile machinery factories. As a result of the increased emphasis given to industries under the second plan, progress is expected to be much more rapid during the next five years. The economy will be greatly strengthened as iron and steel, machine building and other basic industries are developed. Broadly speaking, the capital and producer goods sector will. register increases during the quinquennium which will be substantially in excess of the investments made so far in these fields. The statement below provides an indication of the pattern of industrial growth which will begin to emerge during the second plan. By the end of the second plan the overall index of industrial production (1951 = 100) is estimated to rise to 194 from 130 in 1955-56. Considering the expansion of production sector-wise, it is anticipated that by 1960-61, the index of production of producer goods which stood at 132 in 1955-56, will rise by about 73 per cent. compared to 18 per cent. increase in the factory produced consumer goods sector which stood in 1955-56 at 128.

68. Regional Development of Industries.— Through successive plans, it will be necessary to try to achieve a considerable measure of balance in industrial development as between different regions in the country. The second plan makes a beginning in this direction. Major projects included in it will open relatively less advanced areas in Orissa and Madhya Pradesh. Measures of long term importance for a wider diffusion of the expansion of industries have been included such as the pilot scheme for the production of pig iron in low-shaft blast furnaces which, if successful, has considerable potentialities for developing the iron and steel industry in relatively small units on the basis of low-grade coals occurring in different parts of the country. Surveys for mineral deposits in new areas are also calculated to achieve the same result. Intensification of research on the use of new materials and processes and development of substitutes in envisaged under the plan in the national laboratories and private institutions. Though the second plan will not provide a solution to the problem of the existing unbalanced growth of industries as between different regions, the problem has been kept in view and, through stress on research, mineral surveys and decentralisation of production, particularly in regard to agricultural processing industries the correct trends of development are being set in motion.

Break-up of anticipated investment in the large-scale industries during 1956-61
(Rs in crores)

Public-sector including new investments of NIDC Private sector Total
Producer goods 463 296 759
Industrial machinery and capital goods 84 72 156
Consumer goods 12 167 179
559 535* 1094

*0n certain schemes involving the use of NIDC resources decisions have yet to be taken whether they will be in the public or the private sector.

ANNEXURE I SECOND FIVE YEAR PLAN
(A) Industrial Projects in the Public Sector
(Central Government exclusive a/Schemes of NIDC)

Sl. No. Name of the Scheme Ministry responsible As at the end of March 1956 Second Five Year Plan (1960-61)
Investment (Rs. crores) Capacity (1955-56) Estimated production (1955-56) Investment (Rs. crores) Capacity (1960-61)
1 Three Steel Plants (Rour-kela, Bhilai and Durgapur). Iron and Steel 7.75 350 Finished Steel 23 Million tons and Pig Iron 680,000 tons for foundries
2 South Arcot Lignite Project Production OS 52.0 (a) 3.5 million tons of lignite

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

714,000 tons lignite briquettes, 211,000 KW. of Power 70,000 tons of nitrogen
3 Sindri Fertiliser Factory   28 70,000 tons of nitrogen. 66,000 tons of nitrogen. 7 117,000 tons of nitrogen
4 Nangal Fertiliser cum-Heavy Water Factory " 22 70,000 tons of nitrogen
5 Hindustan Shipyard " 6.0 (1951-56) 50,000 GRT (1951-56) 9.8
6 RouAela Fertiliser Factory " 8 80,000 tons of nitrogen
7 Heavy Electrical Plant

 

02

 

20.0 Items listed on the next
            (e) page
8 Hindustan Machine Tools

 

4.4 N.A Lathes and Components worth Rs.025 crores. 2.0 400 lathes, milling and drilling machines
9 D. D. T. Factories 08 700 tons 284 tons 1.0 2,800 tons
10 Hindustan Antibiotics " 2.1 4.8 mill. mega . units. 6.64 mill. mega units. 1.0 24 mill. mega units, and 15,000 to 20,000 kg. of streptomycin
11 Hindustan Cables

 

1.6 470 miles of cables. (Single shift) 525 miles of cables. 0,5 1000 miles of cables and 300 miles of coaxial cables
12. National Instruments Factory (including optical glass project) " 0.6 Instruments worth Rs. 40 lakhs. Instruments worth Rs. 14.2 lakhs. 0.65 NA
13 Salt Development

 

0.3

 

84.6 Million Maunds (public and Private sectors) 2.0

 

14 Chittaranjan Locomotive Railways 14.6 120 locomotives 125 Locomotives. 5.0 300 locomotives
15 Integral Coach Factory 52 20 coaches

 

350 coaches
16 New M. G. Coach Factory " Nil Nil J 10.0 N.A
17 Engineering Shops for spare parts " Nil^ Nil 7.0 N.A
18 Indian Telephone Industries Communications. 4.109

 

Telephones 50,000 Exchange lines 35,000. 0.5  
19 Teleprinter Factory   0.75 N.A
20 Security Paper Mill Finance 2.5 1,500
      75.8     501.7  
  1. The total cost of the project on completion is estimated at about Rs. 68.85 crores.
  2. Expected to be in fall production by December, 1960.
  3. Expected to be in fall production by the end of 1959.
  4. Expected to be in fall production by the end of 1959. The total cost of the project is estimated at Rs. 16.0 crores and the provision the appropriate stage.
  5. The total cost of the project on completion is estimated at about Rs. 25 crores.
  6. Excludes Rs. 31 lakhs invested by the Mysore Government.

LIST OF ITEMS FOR MANUFACTURE IN THE PROPOSED HEAVY ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT FACTORY

1. Hydraulic turbines and generators 175,000 KW pei
2. Generators for Diesel sets 34,000 KW per
3. Transformers 33 KV and above 500,000 KVA pe
4. Current and Potential transformers Suitable numbe
5. Static capacitors 54,000 KVA per
6. A-C. Circuit breakers 11 KV and abo
7. D. C. Circuit breakers Suitable number
8. Switch-boards and Control Desks  
9. Direct Current Machines 7,000 KW per
Generators and Excitors Required numb
Welding generators Motors 2.000 H. P. per
10. Traction motors, apparatus and equipment 75,000 H. P. pe,
11. A-C. Industrial motors, ratings of 200 H.P. and above 50,000 H. P. per
12. Industrial motor control Within the rai Factory.

(B) Industrial Projects in the Public Sector (Major Schemes of State Governments.)

State Project
Mysore 1. Expansion of Mysore Iron and Steel Works.
2. Expansion of Govt Porcelain Factory.
3. Expansion of Mysore Implements Factory.
4. Expansion of Govt. Electric Factory.
5. Expansion of Govt. Soap Factory.
6. Central Industrial Workshop.
West Bengal Durgapur coke-Oven Project
Assam 1. Textile Mill.
2. Spun Silk Mill.
3. Sugar Mill.
Uttar Pradesh 1. Expansion of U. P. Govt. Cement Factory.
2. Expansion of U. P. Govt. Precision Instruments Factory.
Bihar 1. Bihar Superphosphate Factory.
2. Expansion of Spun Silk Mill.
3. Porcelain Factory.
Hyderabad 1. Expansion of Praga Tools Factory.
2. Hyderabad Tannery.
'Ravancore-Cochin 1. Expansion of Travancore Rubber Works.
2. Expansion of China Clay Scheme.
3. Expansion of Travancore Minerals.
4. Hard Sand Brides Factory.
Andhra 1. Expansion of Sri Venkateswara Board Mills.
2. Expansion of Andhra Paper Mills.
3. Expansion of Ceramic Factory.
MadhyaBharat 1. Cotton Spinning Mill.
2. Distillery.
3. Solvent Extraction Plant.
4. Gwalior Leather and Tannery Factory.
5. Expansion of Gwalior Potteries.
Jammu and Kashmir 1. Silk Spinning Plant.
2. Expansion of Govt. Woollen Factory.
3. Expansion of Govt. Drug Factory.
4. Expansion of Silk Weaving Plant.
Coorg 1. Sandal Wood Oil Factory.
2. Timber Seasoning Kiln.
3. Creosoting Plant.
Pondicherry 1. Sugar Mill.
2. Spinning Mill.

In addition, the State Plans include provision for the establishment of co-operative sugar factories. State Finance Corporations, mineral schemes and for assistance to private industrial schemes. The Plan makes a total provision of Rs. 32 crones for these schemes of which Rs. 23 crores are shown in the State Plans and Rs. 9 crores in the Central Plan.

ANNEXURE II Industrial Development in Private Sector and under the
National Industrial Development Corporation during the Second Plan

IndustriesRemarks Annual capacity Production
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
1. Iron and Steel
(a) Saleable steel by main producers in private sector. Million tons. 1.25 1.25 . 4.5 2.3 2.3 115

(b) Pig Iron for foundries Tons 380,000 380,000 750,000 300,000

2. Structural Fabrications (a) Tons 226,000 180,000 500,000 500,000 500,000 20 Capacity for heavy structurals to be developed by NIDC also.
3. Heavy Foundry-cum-Forge Shops

12

(a) Independent Steel Foundries Tons. 16,000 15,000 15,000

To be developed by the NIDC in the Public Sector.
ft) Forging Shops Tons. 12,000 12,000 12,000}
(c) Cast Iron Foundries Tons. 10,000 10,000 10,000

4.Ferro-Manganese *Ton; 28,000 N.A 160,000 171,800 160,000 9.5
5. Aluminium Ton; 7,500 7,500 30,000 30,000 25,000(b) 22.0 Part of new capacity to be developed by NIDC.
6. Automobiles, motor cycle; and ancillary industries 8

13.0

(a) Automobiles Nos 38,000 25,000 57,000 38,000 57,000

80 per cent Indian content.
(b) Motor Cycles and Scooters nos 11,000 1,000 11,000 11,000 11,000
7. Railway Rolling Stock and ~bther equipment.Locomotives Nos 50 50

100 100 5.0
8. Industrial Machinery (c)
(a) Cotton Textile Value(Rs.crores)   4.0     VI.W) 4.5 (ii)Provisional.
(b) Jute Textile   0.06
(1954)
    2.5 1.3  
(c) Cement     0.56
(1954)
    2.0 1.0  
(d) Sugar   0.28
(1954)
    2.5 2.00  
(e) Paper     Negligible     4.0 1.3  
(f) Printing     Negligible     2.0 1,5  
(g) Others (Heavy Machinery including machine tools)

 

 

 

 

 

 

10.0  
9. Industrial Bearings—Ball and roller bearings Nos. 600,000 860,000 24,00,000 900,000 21,00,000 0.5  
10.Acids—Sulphuric Acid Tons 242,000 170,000 470,000 (e)500,000 (e)470,000 2.5  
11. Alkalies (a) Soda Ash Tons 90,000 80,000 230,000 253,000 230,000 7.5  
(b) Caustic Soda Tons 44,300 36,000 168,800 150,400 135,400 9.0  
12. Fertilizers
(a) Nitrogenous             5.0  
(fixed Nitrogen) Tons 15,000 11,000 370,000 38,000 36,000    
(b) Phosphatic as PaOs Tons 35,000 20,000 120,000 120,000 120,000ff)    
13. Miscellaneous Heavy Chemicals             8.5(g) (g) Covers entire industry.
(a) Calcium Carbide Tons 5,000 3,000 24,000 27,800 24,000    
(b) Potassium Chlorate Tons 2,300 1,500 3,800 4^00 3,800    
(c) Industrial Explosives Tons Nil Nil 5,000 5,000 5,000    
(d) Carbon disulphide Tons 4,700 3,000 14,000 14,000 14,000 W (h)Investment included under Rayon and Staple Fibre Industry.
(e) Carbon Black Tons 800 200 12,000 ' 9.700 8,000

 

To be developed by NIDC.
14. Benzol recovery and rectification             1.0  
(a) Crude Benzol ft) Million Galls 2.4 1.0

 

16.0 16.0

 

(i) Combined data of units in public and private sectors.
(b) Coal Tar Distillation (Tar Distilled) Tons 75,000

 

 

175.0000 175.000

 

(j) Partly under NIDC and partly in public sector.
  1. Includes capacity and production of wagon builders.
  2. Production lower on the basis that the additional 10,000 tons capacity at Hirakud or a new 10.000 tons unit will come into production by the middle of 1960 and operate to full capacity for only 6 months in 1960-61.
  3. Development of some of the items of heavy machinery envisaged under NIDC.
  4. Inclusive of plants in public sector like the sulphuric acid plant of Bihar Superphosphate factory and auxiliary plants in steel vairks and Durgapur Coke Oven Project.
  5. Inclusive of the Bihar Government Superphosphate Factory.

PROGRAMME OF INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
15. Dyestuff and intermediates. Dyestuffs Mill. Lbs. 6.6 4.0 32.0 27.0 22.0 8.7 Partly under N.I.D.C.
16. Petroleum Refining Mill. tons (of crude processed) 3.625 3.6   4.31 4.3 10.0  
17. Paper and Paper Board Tons 210,000 200,000 350,000 450,000 350,000 44.0  
18. Newsprint Tons Nil. Nil 120,000 30,000 30,000 6.0 Two new factories envisaged for development of which one is expected to be in fall production and the other half way through.
19.'Rayon and Staple fibre             24.0 Partly under NIDC
(a) Viscose Filament and Acetate Filament Mill. Ibs. 22.0 15.0 80.0 68.0 68.0    
(b) Staple Fibre   16.0 13.2 35to40 32.0 32.0    
(c) Chemical Pulp Tons Nil Nfl 30,000 30,000 30,000 8.0 Partly under
NIDC
20. Cement mm.
tons
4.9(k) 4.Z(m) 13.0 16.077 l3.0(m) 80.0 (k) 300,000 tons in public sector.
21. Refractories . Tons 444,000 280,000 800,000 1,000,000 800,000 9.0 (I) 500,000 tons in public sector. (m) Overall output
22. jute Manufactures Tons 1,200,000 1,040,000 1,100,000 1.200,000 1,100.000 1.5 New unit envisaged in Assam.
23. Rubber Manufactures:             4.0  
(a) Automobile tyres '000 Nos. 950 910 1,420 1,450 1,420    
(b) Bicycle tyres   6,000 5,750 11,800 11,800 11,800    
24. Cotton Textiles:             30.0  
(a) Yam

MmLbs.

1,750 1630(1955) 1950   1950   (n) As in January, 1955.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(p)Requirements of all varieties inclusive of exports placed at 8,500 million yards.
(b) Mm Cloth Mm. 4,920 W 5100(1955) 5000 or   5000 or  
  Yds.     5500fel   5500  
25. Sugar '000 tons 1,740 1,670 2,250 2,500 22,50 50.0
26.Phannaceuticals:             3.0  
(a) Penicillin Mm. 15.0 6.6 40.0 40.0(il) 40.0(1)   (o) The figures represent the combined capacity and output of the public and private sectors.
  Mega            
  units            
(b) Streptomycin KG     18,000 and ,OW(g) 18.000dn)  
(c) Sulpha Drug3   450,000 N.A. 450,000 450,000 450.000    
(d) PA-S K.G. 36,320 N.A- 113,300 113,300 113,300    
(e) Benzene Hexachloride Tons. 2,000 N.A- 2,500 2,500 2,500    
27. Woollen Textiles:
(a) Wool Tops Mill. Lbs. Nil. Nil. 18.0 9.0 9.0' 2.35  
(b) Woollen and Worsted yarn   38 21.6 27.0 45.0 27.0    
(c) Woollen Cloth Mill yards 48 14.9 20.0 50.0 20.0 15.1W  
28. Bicycles '000 Nos. 760 550 1,250 895 1,250   (r) Estimated investment for the entire group covered by items 28 to 42.
29. Diesel Engines H.P. 200,000 100,000 205,000 220,000 205.000  
30. Power Driven pumps . Nos. 67,492 40-000 86,000 86,000 86.000  
31. Sewing Machines Nos. 46,500 110,000 300,000 85.200 220,000ft)   (s) By the organisedsector.
32. Hurricane Lanterns Mill. Nos. 5.5 5.9 6.0 5:5 6.0    
33. Transformers (33 K. V. and below) KV.A- 675,000(1) 540,000ft) 1,360,000 1,310,000. l,360,000

 

ft) Inclusive of Government Electric factory, Bangalore.
34. Electric Motors (200 H. P. and below) H.P. 292,000 240,000 600,000 600,000 600,000

 

(u) Inclusive of output of public sector.
35. Dry batteries Mill. Nos. 225 166 225 225 225    
36. Storage Batteries . Nos. 307,500 225,000

425,000 350,000 350,000   (v) Additional 75,000 from decentralised sector.
37. Electric Lamps G.L.S. Mill. Nos. 31.0 27.0 50.0 50.0 50.0    
38. Radio Receivers Nos. 162,000 80,000 200,000 162,000 200,000    
39. Cables and Wires—A.C.S.R. Conductors Tons. 15,370 9,000 18,000 20,400 18.000    
40. Electric Fans Nos. 377,700 275,000 600,000 600,000 600,000    
41. Coated Abrasives Reams 150,000 80,000 150,000 255,000 150,000    
42. Grinding Wheels Tons. 1,520 850 1,500 2,110 1,500    
43. Glass and Glassware (other than bangles) Tons. 291,000 125,000 200,000 334,000 200,000    
44. Plastics: S,ynthetic Moulding Powder Tons 1180 725 11,600 11.400 10.600 4.0  
45. Power and Industrial Alcohol Mill Galons. 27.0 18.0 30.0 36.0 18.0 Power Alcohol 1.0  
46. Paints and varnishes           12.0 Industrial Alcohol    
(a) oil based paints, varnishes and enamels Tons. 65,000 39,000 60,000 65,000 60,000    
(b) Nitrocellulose lacquers . Gallons 800,000 300,000 500.000 800,000 500,000    
47. Plywood Mill. Sq. Ft. 150.6 110 100 (Tea-Chest only 167.51 150 (including Commercial plywood)    
48. Starch and Glucose             1.0  
(a) Starch Tons. 77,600 47,000 1,000 100,000 100,000    
(b) Glucose Liquid Tons. 9,100 1,050 5,000 13,000 5,000    
(c) Glucose Powder Tons. 2,600 Negligible 2,800 7,700 2,800    
49. Vegetable Oils             5.0  
(a) Solvent Extraction from Cakes Tons. 82,500(w) 5,000 800,000(w) 64,000

 

(w) in terms of cake processed.
(b) Cotton Seed Oil Tons. N.A 10,000 30,000 30,000    
(c) Total including all sources Mffl. tons. NA 1.8 2.1 2.1    
50. Vanaspati Tons. 445,000 270,000 400,000 445,000 400,000    
51. Soap Tons. 340,000 200,000 300,000 357,000 300,000   Including decent ralized sector.
52. Matches Mill. Gross boxes. 353 32.0 35.0 35.3 35.0(x)   (x) Includes decentralised sector.
53. Tanning and Footwear (organised sector only)
(a) Footwear (Western type) Mill. pairs 5.97 32. 102.00) 5.97 5.97   (y) Total leather footwear requirements.
(b) Footwear (Indian type) 23 2.3    
54. Salt '000   85.000(y) 100,000 100,000(z)   (z) Includes production in public sector.
55. Biscuits and Confectionery: maunds.

 

 

 

 

 

 

(a) Biscuits Tons. 40,000 11,500 15,000 40,000 15,000    
(b) Confectionery Tons. 40,000 8,000 10,000 40,000 10,000    
56.Miscellaneous Industries             11.52  
          total   570.17  
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